Dungeons & Dragons Came to Life in 'She Kills Monsters'

Scene from %22She Kills Monsters%22
Scene from %22She Kills Monsters%22
Scene from %22She Kills Monsters%22
Scene from %22She Kills Monsters%22
A scene from %22She Kills Monsters%22
A scene from %22She Kills Monsters%22
A scene from %22She Kills Monsters%22
A scene from %22She Kills Monsters%22
Dungeons & Dragons Came to Life in 'She Kills Monsters'
Brittany Rockenfeller

The Blair Academy Players presented “She Kills Monsters” on October 28, 29 and 30 at 7:30 p.m. in the Armstrong-Hipkins Center for the Arts’ Wean Theatre. Written by Qui Nguyen, “She Kills Monsters” is an epic, raucous journey of a young woman on a mission to connect with her late sister, complete with swords, fantasts, ’90s pop culture and ogres! 
 
“She Kills Monsters” tells the story of Agnes Evans (played by Alex Schamberger ’22) who loses her parents and little sister Tilly Evans (played by Leilah Elkholy ’25) in a car accident. Agnes discovers that Tilly was an avid participant of the roleplaying game Dungeons and Dragons, and through playing a module that Tilly had written, Agnes embarks into the reality and fantasy world that her sister inhabited.
 
Cheyenne Joachim ’25, Serena Khanna ’25, Grant Breckenridge ’24, and Eli Maloney ’25 make up the adventurers whom Agnes meets in the fantasy world of the game, while Julian Perello ’24 portrays the game’s dungeon master. Marc Lui ’23 portrays Agnes’ confused boyfriend who has to discover what his girlfriend is up to playing the fantasy game, while Amalia Scripsick ’23 and Teodora Vukosavljevic ’25 entertain the audience in several roles. Playing various monsters who attack the intrepid band are Kennedy Henry ’25 and Char Yeiy ’25. The narrator is Hanna Wilke ’23.
 
“ ‘She Kills Monsters’ has become one of the most popular plays in American high schools and colleges,” said veteran Blair theatre teacher and director Craig Evans. “The Blair Academy Players were excited to be performing such a provocative play for its first production of the year.”

This production was intended for mature audiences; due to space constraints in the theatre, it was not open to the public.